red skies. at night. // naccarato // image id/tag #21

The Originals

 

In his latest work entitled “The Originals”, the artist surveys and documents elements of his previous works, as well as reproducing some of his original, digital, content which, arose out of several projects such as The Conversation (2012), The Spaces We AR (2013) and The Democracy of Objects Project (2014): projects which critically explored and examined our ubiquitous relationship between technology and our personal, social and cultural space/s.

‘The Originals’, consist of Original, Limited Edition, Digital Art Works, numbered and signed by Artist. The images measure 4″ x 4″ (10 cm x 10 cm) and are printed on premium high quality card stock with matte finish and mounted on hand painted birch wood panels (.75. depth) //

… check them out at http://naccarato.org/originals/ 

Upcoming Exhibition:

KickDrum and artinest have currated a special exhibition of local art, which will be on display for the 3 days of the Winter Marathon at La Petite Cuillère & L’Artiste Affamé…. both just a 1-minute walk from Sherbrooke Metro.

Vernissage on Thursday, Jan 14th, from 6pm to 9pm: all participating artists will be “on location” at both cafes to meet you all and talk about their work!

Exhibition runs from Jan 14th – 16th // Art will be for sale

ENTRY BY DONATION // FREE FOOD!
* Every person who donates is entered into out art raffle!

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KickDrum et Artinest ont organisé deux expositions d’arts visuels par des artistes locaux, sur les 3 jours du Marathon d’Hiver, à La Petite Cuillère et l’Artiste Affamé, deux cafés côte à côte, à une minute du metro Sherbrooke.

Le Jeudi 14, de 6 à 9pm, tous les artistes seront présents pour le vernissage des expos!

Les œuvres seront exposées du 14 au 16 Janvier // Certaines seront à vendre

ENTRÉE PAR DONS // SNACKS GRATUITS
*toute personne faisant un don à l’entrée participera au tirage au sort pour gagner une des œuvres!

 

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Democracy of Objects

Ordinarily, upon hearing the word “object”, the first thing we think is “subject”. Our second thought, perhaps, is that objects are fixed, stable and unchanging, and therefore to be contrasted with events and processes. The object, we are told, is that which is opposed to a subject, and the question of the relation between the subject and the object is a question of how the subject is to relate to or represent the object. The Democracy of Objects, Levi R. Bryant

 

On one of my many ritual walks around the St. Henri hood (Sud-Ouest, Montreal), I’d come across an array of objects scattered along the streets, alleyways or in someone’s backyard. Some of these objects were still intact and recognizable, while others were in the process of partial decay – still hinting as to their past purpose.

And there were still others which had been busted up so bad – removed from their original material body – that their physical presence had become a sort of abstracted entity onto themselves. However, what all these objects seemed to have common, was that they had been either rejected, lost, or left behind – their purpose served?

Object File #03 | found on April 24 | #Montreal #street #space #democracyofobjects

An important question began to materialize for me during these ritual walks and encounters with said objects. What is the relationship of these objects to myself, to society and to the spaces they inhibit now – besides of course their obvious environmental impact?

This line of questioning also brought to mind a realization that I had become involved in some sort of anthropological and archaeological quest. But I wasn’t so concerned about the origins of these found objects, as much as, their state of existence in the moment I encountered them. To this end I decided to document them (via my cell phone) as a sort of photographic impression of their present state of being.

Object File #01 | found on April 24 | #Montreal #street #space #democracyofobjects

The project takes its title ‘Democracy of Objects,’ from an essay I had read a few weeks earlier by Levi R. Bryant, also entitled, ‘The Democracy of Objects‘. However, the choosing of the title also had to do with the way these found objects would seem to present themselves during my walks. What at first appeared to be a sort of archaic formation as to their displacement, began to postulate a very different possibility in relationship to myself, and the spaces I moved through on a daily basis.

In his essay, Bryant points out an interesting point about our relationship to objects in that a ‘division between the world of nature and the world of the subject and culture’ occurs and that ‘the question of the object, of what substances are, is subtly transformed into the question of how and whether we know objects’. 

Object File #07 | found on April 24 | #Montreal #street #space #democracyofobjects

So I began to also ask myself: do I really know these objects? How and why had I happened to come upon them? I began to realize that the objects themselves had no one system of prioritization. Each object wasn’t any more or less important than the other, except perhaps for the location in which they had been discarded – which in turn effected where and how I would discover them. Another important question was how I chose to prioritize them in my own mind’s eye, that is, the process of choosing which objects to document. I quickly realized the choices being made were based on my own subjective experiences – the objects color, form, state and use.

Furthermore, the process of documenting the objects allowed them to now exist and function on three levels or referential points – past, present and future. Their past – their state upon discovery – had left behind some material clues as to their identity. From these clues, one could if they wished, trace their initial functional purpose; the materials and process that brought them into being, and their intended position within a societal setting. Their present relates to their state as a photographic impression, now captured in time according to when I had encountered and documented them. Their future however, was indeterminate, but would now continue to unfold on two fronts – physically and virtually. 

Physically, of course, the objects would continue to evolve or devolve – depending on how one choose to interpret the process. There would definitely be a process of physical change over time to these objects in relationship to their environment.

Object File #13 | found on April 25 | #Montreal #street #space #democracyofobjects

The objects once documented and grouped together based on the date they were discovered, would in turn change their original relationship and meaning to each other and myself. Once posted online, they relational meaning to each other and myself would change once again.

Why post the objects onto social media sites? In a sense it is a continuation of that initial question I had asked myself during my ritual walks: What is the relationship of these objects to myself, to society and to the spaces they inhibit? This time however, they exist within a virtual space, where the process of discovery and choosing of specific objects occurs through other participants online. As participants come across and discover these now virtual-ized found objects within their own social virtual environments, they may choose to interact with them. In a sense, the objects now move to another plane of relational existence – one with the participants.

Object File #14 | found on April 25 | #Montreal #street #space #democracyofobjects

Overview of Objects Documented @ The Spaces We AR

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Interact the Objects:

View on Instagram | Or upload your own with hashtag:  #democracyofobjects

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#archaeology, #investigation #lost #found #object #democracy #collections #the-empirical-method #found-objects

Red Steel | Trois-Rivières, QC | 2013 | John Naccarato

The Spaces We AR: St Henri

“… the privatisation of the public realm, through the growth of ‘private-public’ space, produces over controlled, sterile places which lack connection to the reality and diversity of the local environment, with the result that they all tend to look the same. They also raise serious questions about democracy and accountability. But perhaps most worrying of all are the effects on cohesion, battered by the creation of atomised enclaves of private space which displace social problems into neighbouring districts. This process enhances the ‘hot spot’/‘cold spot’ pattern which is already an entrenched part of the urban landscape” (The Privatisation of Public Space, Anna Minton).

The alarming escalation of condo developments in Montreal has begun to gut the cultural and social infrastructure of the city. Such developments cater to a small niche of the population  with no clear philosophy by its developers or city politicians as to their impact on neighbourhoods and the city.

What is for certain is that such developments have triggered mass gentrification of low income neighbourhoods and historic areas throughout Montreal such as the Sud-Ouest area along the Lachine Canal.

The Angel

Title: The Angel | Billboard/Logo in front of massive Condo Development at the Northern Electric Company site | Griffintown, Montreal | 2013 | John Naccarato

So what can be done about it?  Though we cannot directly (physically) reclaim the spaces which have been lost to gentrification and condofication, we can re-appropriate these spaces through a virtual (Augmented Reality – AR) Public Intervention. In so doing an awareness may be created as to the spaces we occupy and move through and how critical such spaces are to our  own personal, social and cultural identities.

Spaces, Espaces, Interactive Map

An interactive map of locations and images can be accessed here: Interactive Map. Below are the digital photos created and pinned to specific geo-markers of those sites in which Condos were being constructed. 

More info @ The Spaces We AR: St. Henri Website

 

The Frame, Naccarato, 2013

The Conversation (Part 01) Ritual Gestures

The Conversation, Ritual Gestures, The Frame, Berkeley Art Museum, CSTMS, University of California, Berkeley San Francisco, Naccarato, 2013 The Conversation, Ritual Gestures, Tap and Swipe, CSTMS, University of California, Berkeley, Yerba Buena Island, San Francisco, Naccarato, 2013 The Conversation, Ritual Gestures, The Search, CSTMS, University of California, Berkeley, Alcatraz, San Francisco, Naccarato, 2013 The Conversation, Ritual Gestures, The Prayer, CSTMS, University of California, Berkeley, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco, Naccarato, 2013 The Conversation, Ritual Gestures, The Couple, CSTMS, University of California, Berkeley, Union Square Park, San Francisco, Naccarato, 2013 The Conversation, Ritual Gestures, The Frame Revisted, CSTMS, University of California, Berkeley, Chinatown, San Francisco, Naccarato, 2013 The Conversation, Ritual Gestures, The Dance, CSTMS, University of California, Berkeley, 200 Kansas St & 15th, San Francisco, Naccarato, 2013 The Conversation, Ritual Gestures, Over The Shoulder, CSTMS, University of California, Berkeley, Hearst Greek Theatre, San Francisco, Naccarato, 2013 The Conversation, Ritual Gestures, The Duel, CSTMS, University of California, Berkeley, Mission District, San Francisco, Naccarato, 2013 The Conversation, Ritual Gestures, Occupied, CSTMS, University of California, Berkeley, Golden Gate Bridge, San Francisco, Naccarato, 2013 The Conversation, Ritual Gestures, Over the Shoulder Revisted, CSTMS, University of California, Berkeley, Haight-Ashbury, San Francisco, Naccarato, 2013 The Conversation, Ritual Gestures, The Remote, CSTMS, University of California, Berkeley, Campanile Esplanade, San Francisco, Naccarato, 2013

The act of observing or interacting via technological devices generates repetitive gestures. We use these gestures to access our technological devices. Over time, these gestures become recognizable actions intertwined with our personal, social and cultural identity. They become part of our everyday rituals… Read More 

Performers (in order of appearance): Teoma Naccarato, Jesse Herbert, David Daly, John Naccarato and  Marie Bourassa.

Public Intervention Locations (San Francisco and Berkeley, USA): Union Square Park, Chinatown, UC Berkeley Art Museum, Alcatraz, Haight-Ashbury, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Campanile Esplanade, Yerba Buena Island, Mission District, 200 Kansas St & 15th, Hearst Greek Theater and Golden Gate Bridge. See AR (interactive) Map.

The Conversation | Part 01 | Ritual Gestures premiered at the (Un)certain Boundaries: Visualizing the Intersections of Science & Society SymposiumCenter for Science, Technology, Medicine & Society (CSTMS), University of California, Berkeley.

 

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the Spaces WE AR – public intervention

The Spaces We AR: Montreal – Intervention and interaction between public and artist’s work in the Parc du Premier-Chemin-De-Fer, located in the Saint Henri, Sud Ouest area. This public event will take place throughout the weekend of September 26, 27, 2015 as part of Les Journées de la Culture. (Also Open Call for Artists until September 15)

Interventions et interactions entre les artistes et le publique. Les artistes travailleront sur le site du Parc du Premier-Chemin-De-Fer situé dans le quartier Saint-Henri. Cet événement s’inscrit dans le cadre des Journées de la Culture qui aura lieu les 26-27 septembre 2015. (Appel de dossiers jusqu’au 15 septembre 2015)

https://www.facebook.com/events/923095701078656/

 

 

 

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Digital Landscape Series: The Horizon

The Digital Landscape Series: The Horizon is made up of 14 digital plates (versions). They were shot with my HTC Desire (Android Phone) in the Eastern Townships, Quebec (2013). I’ve long held an interest regarding Landscape. I had explored it extensively through the oil paintings which I created between 1995 to 2005. Although the digital medium does not have the same tactile quality as oil painting the intended subject is still able to break through and define itself in unexpected ways.

Digital, Landscape, Series, Horizon, 'Plate 01, Naccarato, Digital, Photo, Composition, HTC Desire, Android, mobile Phone, Eastern Townships, Sutton, Quebec, 2013

Digital, Landscape, Series, Horizon, 'Plate 02, Naccarato, Digital, Photo, Composition, HTC Desire, Android, mobile Phone, Eastern Townships, Sutton, Quebec, 2013

Plate 03, Digital, Landscape, Series, Horizon,  Naccarato, Digital, Photo, Composition, HTC Desire, Android, mobile Phone, Eastern Townships, Sutton, Quebec, 2013

Digital, Landscape, Series, Horizon,  Naccarato, Digital, Photo, Composition, HTC Desire, Android, mobile Phone, Eastern Townships, Sutton, Quebec, 2013, Plate 04,

Digital, Landscape, Series, Horizon,  Naccarato, Digital, Photo, Composition, HTC Desire, Android, mobile Phone, Eastern Townships, Sutton, Quebec, 2013, Plate 05,

Digital, Landscape, Series, Horizon,  Naccarato, Digital, Photo, Composition, HTC Desire, Android, mobile Phone, Eastern Townships, Sutton, Quebec, 2013, Plate 06,

Digital, Landscape, Series, Horizon,  Naccarato, Digital, Photo, Composition, HTC Desire, Android, mobile Phone, Eastern Townships, Sutton, Quebec, 2013, Plate 07,

Digital, Landscape, Series, Horizon,  Naccarato, Digital, Photo, Composition, HTC Desire, Android, mobile Phone, Eastern Townships, Sutton, Quebec, 2013, Plate 08,

Digital, Landscape, Series, Horizon,  Naccarato, Digital, Photo, Composition, HTC Desire, Android, mobile Phone, Eastern Townships, Sutton, Quebec, 2013, Plate 09,

Digital, Landscape, Series, Horizon,  Naccarato, Digital, Photo, Composition, HTC Desire, Android, mobile Phone, Eastern Townships, Sutton, Quebec, 2013, Plate 10,

Digital, Landscape, Series, Horizon,  Naccarato, Digital, Photo, Composition, HTC Desire, Android, mobile Phone, Eastern Townships, Sutton, Quebec, 2013, Plate 11,

Digital, Landscape, Series, Horizon,  Naccarato, Digital, Photo, Composition, HTC Desire, Android, mobile Phone, Eastern Townships, Sutton, Quebec, 2013, Plate 12,

Digital, Landscape, Series, Horizon,  Naccarato, Digital, Photo, Composition, HTC Desire, Android, mobile Phone, Eastern Townships, Sutton, Quebec, 2013, Plate 13,

Digital, Landscape, Series, Horizon,  Naccarato, Digital, Photo, Composition, HTC Desire, Android, mobile Phone, Eastern Townships, Sutton, Quebec, 2013, Plate 14,

 

The Scream (vs 05)

The Scream (vs 05)

The Scream (vs 05)

The Scream (vs05), Digital Print | Naccarato | Part of International Exhibition entitled Open Doors @ Portas Abertas, Evora, Portugal | July 11 to October 06, 2013

Open Doors is a project aimed to reflect on the condition of the world and modern societies, where the fundamental values ​​of equality, freedom, inclusion and cultural diversity are constantly challenged by manifestations of intolerance, exclusion, injustice and discrimination, that recur throughout the history of civilization.

An intergenerational participation of artists from more than sixty countries in five continents consolidates the OpenDoors project, as a collaborative local and global project, that fills the entire exhibition space of the Fórum, with works that are thematically related to the historical context of the place where they are presented and the world today.

The multiple languages ​​or creative expressions of the works, as well as the variety of their origins, ensure the timeliness of the critical readings of our reality, through contemplation of complex historical processes, which have profoundly marked the lives of so many cultures, and continue to challenge individuals and societies, even today. The notion of occupancy and opening embody the principles of hospitality and dialogue, the supporting pillars of Open Doors. Thus, the project is presented as a work in progress, which is enhanced in accordance to participation of the visitors, asked to become creatively engaged in the exhibition.

Portas Abertas, Evora, Portugal

metro-AR

TV BUG

‘The hive, then, extends itself as part of the environment through the social probing that individual bees enact where the intelligence of the interaction is not located in any one bee, or even a collective of bees as a stable unit, but in the “in-between” space of becoming: bees relating to the mattering milieu, which becomes articulated as a continuum to the social behavior of the insect community. This community is not based on representational content, then, but on distributed organization of the society of nonhuman actors.” (K. Von Frisch)

TV Bug (AR)

TV BUG | Channel 01 |  Lionel Groulx Metro Station (Montreal) | AR Marker and Video still  | 2013 | John Naccarato

Bug01As a child I’d spend countless hours observing and tracking insects – grasshoppers, ants, butterflies – in a field behind my house. I was fascinated with their hidden and mysterious worlds. They occupied the same space I did and yet seemed distant and alien. They went about their day to day rituals almost indifferent to my existence until of course our paths converged. I remember one such occasion, when running through a field, my presence triggered a chain reaction, one in which hundreds of grasshoppers suddenly leaped forward in escape.

Our relationship to insects and their seemingly invisible world, colors our perceptions and experiences in profound and uncountable ways – from real life encounters to metaphors about our fears and problems.

bug02We readily appropriate insects – their form, actions and seemingly alien-like existence for use in sci-fi and horror movies. Or to define an error, failure or fault in a system and program – a computer bug. Or our health – there’s a bug going around. Of course there’s also reference to surveillance – the planting of bugs to eavesdrop on unsuspecting participants or more recently, the military’s development of Cyborg Insect Drones for surveillance purposes.

TV Bug uses this appropriative and metaphorical play on insect space to play off and interfere with 4 more spaces in our ‘real’ world experiencing: 2D (Screens / TV, Computer); Digital (Coding/software); Physical (Space we occupy) and lastly, Augmented (mobile).

bug04The visual and audio footage which make up ‘TV BUG’ were appropriated from five different sources: David Attenborough – Life in the Undergrowth (BBC 2005); V/H/S (Magnet Releasing 2012); Ashes to Ashes (BBC 2008); Three hours and 19 minutes of 4×3 snow (YouTube); The Sound of Cicadas – Amazing Noise of Dense Cicadas (YouTube), and Êt $1 Øn &”¥ më∏àît èÑ∫!n ¿ (Nocturno Motoculto).

 

bug03And lastly, ‘TV BUG’ was developed in conjunction with ‘TV BUG (AR)’. ‘TV BUG (AR)’ is a public space intervention using Augmented Reality (AR) mobile technology to pin selected video sequences from ‘TV BUG’ to specific GPS locations in and around Montreal, Canada. Access to and the experiencing of these augmented sequences is via any smart device (phone, pad, and tablet).
 

Britain at War

War of the Worlds Revisited

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War of the Worlds Revisited (in progress) created and presented @ Musitk (Montreal): June 30, July 01, 2012

Inspired in part by Orson Welles ‘The War of the Worlds’ radio drama broadcast. The original broadcast was aired via The Mercury Theatre and CBS on Halloween night – October 30, 1938. The episode was an adaptation of H. G. Wells’s novel The War of the Worlds.

In this AR (Augmented Reality) adaptation, we – hack space – and explore the power of media as an intervention to alter and augment the participants reality at any given moment – especially if the media’s content is experienced out of context.

Created by John Naccarato and Shereen Soliman

 

Project Chorale

Project Chorale: AR @ Music Hack Day Montreal

Project Chorale

Project Chorale | AR @ Music Hack Day | Montreal | 2011 | John Naccarato & Shereen Solimon

Subverting public space via an augmented (AR) sound & image intervention, created by John Naccarato and Shereen Soliman as part of Music Hack Day Montreal on September 25th, 2011, at Eastern Bloc.

I should explain what we did first. We stopped random strangers on the street and asked them to express themselves vocally – in a sort of sing-song way – which we then recorded. We then created colored music notes which were assigned to each voice.

Both the images and voices were uploaded and processed via an (AR) Augmented Reality open source processor which allowed us to define certain GPS trigger points in and around Eastern Bloc where the event took place. So visitor/participants were able to use their smart phones to scan the space, locating predefined GPS points which in turn would trigger the music notes and their associated sounds: the voices of strangers previously recorded.

Projet Chorale was developed as part of a larger project which is still in development and which intends to create a public intervention between ‘Artists’ and the ‘Public’ so that they may interact and critique issues surrounding Public Space. The thematic wrapper or entry point for the project will be notions of ‘Intimacy’.

The term “Artists’ within the context of this project signifies anyone involved in any singular disciple and/or inter/multi/trans-disciplines. An underlining objective of the project is to explore and examine the emerging technology of Augmented Reality (AR), and how such a technology may be situated as a new means of expression, in order to create a new potential for interventionist and expressive practices.

The project is also very interested in any works and theories which are pushing the boundaries of creative and expressive thought and how this could be implemented with AR. Some such possible intersections may include any combinations of these disciplines: Visual Arts, New Media, Performance, Sound, Text, Dance, Animation, Social Sciences, Political Sciences, Physical Sciences, Fashion, Design, Technology, Bio-Technology, Media, Social Media, Phenomenology, etc.

wiki.musichackday.org/

 

I Believe

i Believe

i believe

i Believe | Text Based AR Public Intervention Project | Live Camera AR Still | 2011 | John Naccarato

During the first half of 2011, I looked at the potential of Augmented Reality mobile technology (AR) for creating awareness around issues of public and private space.  The project ‘i Believe’ came into existence in part due to a previous project Intimacy in Public Space: Site Specific Performance & Interventionist Work with New Media in which I and fellow artist (Sarah Nesbitt) had curated during the Art Matters Festival (Montreal, 2007) The project had involved a series of performance-based interventions where artists were asked to create intimate moments between themselves and the public questioning notions about intimacy or lack thereof, within public spaces.

With ‘i Believe’, the focus became the alarming escalation of condo developments in Montreal which I felt was gutting the cultural and social infrastructure of the city. This rise in condo development seemed to be catering to a small niche of the population with no clear philosophy by its developers as to their impact on the neighbourhoods and the city itself. Furthermore, Montreal’s condo development had triggered a mass gentrification of low income rental and historic areas.

I decided that perhaps the best way to approach this issue would be to create a psychogeographical study, one which could help critique and understand how major shifts in a city’s infrastructure affects memory, identity and ritual play. As a tool, AR was perfect since it allowed for virtual objects such as text, sound, 2D/3D image and video to remain hidden in public space until participants were made aware of their presence.

One example of the project ‘i Believe’, was where text was used as an AR object to trigger awareness of a particular green space being used as a public throughway. The text was only visible through the use of a smart device (mobile phone/pad/tablet) and only when participants were near the general area. Via their smart device participants could witness a six foot high black text ‘i believe’ intersecting onto the path which appeared to be blocking their way. Even though the text was virtual and overlaid onto the physical space being viewed, the text’s apparent real presence was powerful and profound.

Perhaps for me the most important aspect of such an AR interaction was how one’s action leaves behind an intimate trace or memory imprint which can be shared with others. It creates a very private moment in a highly public space. Of course the inverse is true when a large block of concrete and mortar – a condo – stands in your way, negating any form of intimacy or public interaction.

Some questions which arose from the project were:

  1.  How does the experiencing of the AR event affect or alter the participant’s relationship to that specific space? Can the existence of the AR text affect the space even without the participants’ awareness of its existence?
  2. Does the participant carry the residual memory imprints of that specific experience with them, so that if they return to the specific place, they remember the experience – even if they no longer see the object?

 


 

 

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AR Intervention @ MoMA

We AR MoMA

We AR MoMA | (AR) Intervention on the MoMA | Intervention Overview & artist’s Chimera Head (AR) | 2010 | John Naccarato

MoMA NYC Augmented Reality Group Exhibit

A group of 42 artists including myself took up the call by organizers/artists – Mark Skwarek from New York and Sander Veenhof from the Netherlands, to create an (AR) Augmented Reality Intervention on the MoMA (Museum of Modern Art) in NYC on October 29, 2010… website

The experimental exhibition was part of the Conflux Festival, the annual New York festival dedicated to the psychogeography practice. With the exhibition, the organisers of the event aim to address a contemporary issue, caused by the rapid rise of Augmented Reality usage. What is the impact of AR on our public and private spaces? Is the distinction between the two fading, or are we approaching a situation with an even increasing fragmentation of realities to be perceived individually? (http://www.sndrv.nl/moma/index.php?page=press)

Reviews: WIRED – Beyond the Beyond (EN) | Creators Project | NY Times |
 

Exhibition Overview

Obscure Objects of Desire and the Rise of the Technological Chimera

“Because the essence of technology is nothing technological, essential reflection upon technology and decisive confrontation with it must happen in a realm that is, on the one hand, akin to the essence of technology and, on the other, fundamentally different from it. Such a realm is art. But certainly only if reflection upon art, for its part, does not shut its eyes to the constellation of truth, concerning which we are questioning” (Heidegger).

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Obscure Objects of Desire and the Rise of the Technological Chimera (Hybrid Sculptural Objects), Exhibition Overview: Axeneo7, Gatineau, QC, 2010

OVERVIEW

The project, ‘The Obscure Objects of Desire and the Rise of the Technological Chimera’ looks at how media technologies are remediated. How such technologies manifesting as objects emit a presence which is not singularly transparent but is in a sense haunted. Such technologies have their own evolutionary transcended processes which when, integrated with human presence configures a new reality imbued with ‘technological chimeras’.

Part of this rise of the Technological Chimera has to do with how machine and human have begun to fold onto each other. In turn, this has created what I refer to as a ‘second skin’. It is through this new skin that we have begun to access memory and identity. A possible end game to all this may be less dramatic than we had originally thought. For it is not the machine, which will rise up to embrace and simulate the complex nuances which defines humanity, but the exact reverse. We will in turn succumb to the machine’s own limitations, adapting to its own vision and language of what it means to be human.

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Details
 

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the Skinning of Memory (VP2) | Page 01

Naccarato, Vertebra, Part 2: The Skinning of Memory (VP2) | 20’W x 17’H x 16’D | Mixed Media | Site-Specific/Immersive Installation | Partial/Detail Views | Artist Studio, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada 2009

Con’t >>> Page 02

 

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the Skinning of Memory (VP2) | Page 02

Naccarato, Vertebra, Part 2: The Skinning of Memory (VP2) | 20’W x 17’H x 16’D | Mixed Media | Site-Specific/Immersive Installation | Partial/Detail Views | Artist Studio, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada 2009

Con’t >>> Page 03

 

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the Skinning of Memory (VP2) | Page 03

Naccarato, Vertebra, Part 2: The Skinning of Memory (VP2) | 20’W x 17’H x 16’D | Mixed Media | Site-Specific/Immersive Installation | Partial/Detail Views | Artist Studio, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada 2009

Con’t >>> Page 04